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In the six years that I have been affiliated with the Kennedy Center I have grown to love the New York Times.  Sure, I occasionally thumb through the flashy headlines of vanished planes, rogue pirates and royal weddings, but what I truly adore is the Wednesday edition.  What’s so special about Wednesdays?  It is New York Times – Dining day.  For years, the first thing I do when coming to work on Wednesdays is leaf through that day’s New York Times, section D.

From a young age I have loved to hear about far away places, different cultures and people.  For a time, I tried to fool myself into thinking that I was interested in politics and government, because that’s what internationally-minded people like to talk about, right? True confession – I have found I have very little interest in politics and governments as a whole. I do, however, still love learning about these far away places.  Once a week, as I read my New York Times Dining I enrich my understanding of peoples, holidays, religions, horticultures and yes, foods from around the world.  For example, today’s dining section in some way covers: Jewish Rosh Hashana, Uzbekistan, Catalonia, Australia, France, Northern China, and Italy.  (Not to mention the large advertisement mentioning intellectual tours to Provance, Israel and the West Bank, Belgium and Northern France, and New Zealand).

Often as I read and fantasize about far away places I run across a type of food, a country, a religion, or a holiday that I know very little about. When this happens I find myself Googling away more of my morning then I care to admit.  Such was the case this morning.  There are two recipes highlighted for Rosh Hashana (one of them something called Plov from Uzbekistan).  As I read the articles I recognized I know very little about 1.  Rosh Hashana, 2.  Uzbekistan, 3.  Plov.  I once again delved into the far reaches of the internet searching out these 3 things and learning more about these unfamiliar topics.  This is the manner that I choose to Expand My World – via food and learning about a region and its people I might even be tempted to dabble a bit in a little light political trivia.

Rice, carrots and onion are some of the ingredients in plov, a special occasion dish from Uzbekistan Nicole Tung for The New York Times

Rice, carrots and onion are some of the ingredients in plov, a special occasion dish from Uzbekistan
Nicole Tung for The New York Times

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