kclecture3

After President Trump’s inauguration, women from all over  took to the streets in protest n the iconic Women’s March. But some– thousands– of Chinese women took to the streets for a reason that has gone largely unheard– to “support feminist activities that are facing sustained political pressure in China.” Many belong to the Chinese Feminism Collective. Throughout the duration of the march, the thousands who either lived in the United States or who were merely visiting sent back Wechat reports to China. Ms. Lu, a former journalist visiting from Beijing to attend a United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, had worked closely with what became known in China as the Feminist Five– Wang Man, Wei Tingting, Zheng Churan, Li Tingting and Wu Rongrong. These women were detained as they “planned a public awareness campaign about sexual harassment on public transportation.” After this, police visited Ms. Lu’s apartment and she opted to stay in the United States. She set up a Facebook page in support and it continued to gain support even after the women were released.

This is just one example of many kinds of oppression Chinese women face.

This feminist uprising occurred internationally, and has fostered a newfound unity between women across the globe, who reach out now to support each other much more than common in the past. Many took President Trump’s election and inauguration as a personal threat, and took the fact the Hillary Clinton was not elected as a statement that women are in some way inferior. I think another question that needs raising is how this new unity on an international scale might affect relations between counties, and how to will stratify the ever-growing divide in our own country.

 

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